Posted in Vancouver

Inukshuk

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Inukshuk are a human-made stone landmark or cairn used by the Inuit and other Arctic peoples. Their popularity reached a crescendo during our 2010 Olympics here, where the Inukshuk symbol was ubiquitous across Canada. People started building them everywhere, especially along False Creek (pictured here), where there are a lot of rocks to balance with. Even now, almost a decade later, people still like to build them! That is Science World in the background, originally built for Expo 86. I had a season pass and I never forgot the experience. My hair was dyed blonde then, so I fit in nicely with the multicultural feel. Don’t ask. It’s an Asian thing.

Posted in art

Street Art

Here is a picture of a delightful mural. At 21 metres (over 65 feet)  it is, by far, Vancouver’s largest such public art.

Ocean Concrete has long served as Granville Island’s  last tie to its industrial past. It’s six grey concrete silos are being transformed into a piece of public art by a duo of innovative Brazilian street artists.

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Os Gemeos are identical twin brothers from Sao Paolo, making a Canadian debut with their biggest work to date.
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Note the detail. The pair gained international acclaim during the 2014 World Cup by designing the FIFA World Cup Boeing 737.

The mural is part of the Vancouver Biennale’s 2014-2016 exhibition, a non-profit organization that celebrates art in public spaces.  Public crowd source funding is helping to offset the cost of the $125,000 project.

I love these, no surprise, and would like to see more of this in our increasingly monochromatic city. Do you have any cool public art in your city that you love or, God forbid, hate?