Posted in Vancouver

Lonsdale Quay

I love this market, located in North Vancouver – it is accessible by Sea Bus (our aquatic rapid transit that has been in operation since the late 1970s), or by two bridges, Lions Gate or Ironworker’s Memorial.

Normally a bustling tourist mecca, it is definitely champing at the bit to get back to its regular hectic pace. A few shops and vendors have toughed it out and are selling their wares.

There is a maritime feel to the locale, as it is the former site of a ship repair dock. There are still many related businesses in the area, where ships go to get repairs, improvements – like a garage or beauty parlor, I suppose.

Do pop in if you are in the area – located at the bottom of Lonsdale Street, you can go for a bracing jog up the hill, as I do, from time to time. A bus can take you up, as well, all the way to the foot of Grouse Mountain. One thing about North Vancouver, there are hills and slopes, as is the common topography of Vancouver.

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Some of the artfully displayed seafood.
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It is very reassuring to these vendors back to work – they have a long uphill battle to come. The tourist trade is right out of the equaition.
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Like a grand dame, seated at the entrance – she is a Labradoodle.

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Very happy that they have opened, after such a lengthy closure.
Posted in Vancouver

Inukshuk

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Inukshuk are a human-made stone landmark or cairn used by the Inuit and other Arctic peoples. Their popularity reached a crescendo during our 2010 Olympics here, where the Inukshuk symbol was ubiquitous across Canada. People started building them everywhere, especially along False Creek (pictured here), where there are a lot of rocks to balance with. Even now, almost a decade later, people still like to build them! That is Science World in the background, originally built for Expo 86. I had a season pass and I never forgot the experience. My hair was dyed blonde then, so I fit in nicely with the multicultural feel. Don’t ask. It’s an Asian thing.

Posted in uncategorized, Vancouver

Granville Island

One of my favourite hangouts in the world, due to its picturesque location in Vancouver, and its arts community vibe, Granville Island. It is actually a peninsula, and is located across False Creek from downtown Vancouver. I have worked here and taken some arts courses here, so it holds a special place in my heart.

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Looking very quiet these days, but the market is still open, but most of the galleries and maritime-related businesses are closed. Granville Island is a tourist mecca and is usually crawling with tourists and traffic. I like the peace.

 

 

Why I dig Granville Island so much, is the art-y sensibility. As you can see, there are some cartoon-y decorations on some otherwise pretty mundane objects. I approve of this. There was a Harris’s hawk at Granville Island, which I took some pictures of – he didn’t mind, but I wasn’t allowed to let him perch on my shoulder. (he doesn’t take kindly to strangers, but he is quite vain, and enjoyed my picture taking.)

 

 

Barnacles encrusted on the docks and some canine denizens of Granville Island. For some reason, this boat is on display beneath the bridge. That yellow building is the best art supply store in Canada, bar none. I am not just saying that because I used to work there. Not much, anyway. They are doing a mostly online trade right now – I’d highly recommend them, if you are of an artistic bent, their mail order service is second to none. Hope you enjoyed this pandemic post of Granville Island – don’t miss it if you ever visit our city!

 

Copyright 2020 All pictures by Wilt Sugiyama, and they look pretty decent at that, despite not having much of an eye for composition and a tendency to snap at anything that moves. Today’s technology is very forgiving. 😃

Posted in uncategorized

Pandemic and Support for Front Line Workers

Here are a few examples of local support for our health care workers, here in Vancouver BC! Anyone who must brave the front lines, be it in a retail setting, driving a truck, in the police force, emergency services, and care home or hospital settings – you are heroic, in my books. By the way, don’t set off fireworks (or make a huge racket) at 7pm to express your support – they need their sleep!

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Posted in summer, uncategorized

Pool Fool

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Last summer, there was so much smoke in the air that outdoor fun was out. This summer, most of our beaches are no-swim zones due to high coliform (poo) counts. Childhood memories of sharing bathwater with friends in England, very barbaric, I was usually third of four, the water a kinda translucent at that point. The last person might as well have a bath in the kitchen sink with the dirty dishes.

Posted in cars

Not So Smart Car?

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This was the sight I was treated to on a small trip to Steveston, just south Of Vancouver Canada, a former Japanese fishing village. The rest of Canada holds us in contempt, with our laid back and chill attitudes. This picture will not help matters.

I wouldn’t like to be near it on the highway if a stiff breeze suddenly launched it skyward. Despite what you may have heard, we no longer commute by kayak up here. Still, it made us smile.

Posted in art

Street Art

Here is a picture of a delightful mural. At 21 metres (over 65 feet)  it is, by far, Vancouver’s largest such public art.

Ocean Concrete has long served as Granville Island’s  last tie to its industrial past. It’s six grey concrete silos are being transformed into a piece of public art by a duo of innovative Brazilian street artists.

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Os Gemeos are identical twin brothers from Sao Paolo, making a Canadian debut with their biggest work to date.
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Note the detail. The pair gained international acclaim during the 2014 World Cup by designing the FIFA World Cup Boeing 737.

The mural is part of the Vancouver Biennale’s 2014-2016 exhibition, a non-profit organization that celebrates art in public spaces.  Public crowd source funding is helping to offset the cost of the $125,000 project.

I love these, no surprise, and would like to see more of this in our increasingly monochromatic city. Do you have any cool public art in your city that you love or, God forbid, hate?

Posted in humor, Vancouver

High Pool Confidential

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Here is a nice little luxury at one of the apartments in downtown Vancouver.  This is an area of real estate for anyone who has their own personal shower in a plane. It is a pool that extends into thin air, giving the public at large a sight of your ballooning swim trunks and un-Phelps-like doggy paddle.

I imagine, of course, a strict dress code would be in place so as not to offend looky-loos (with their telephoto lenses) – bathing attire from the 1890s, or those full body sunscreen suits that make you look like you just fell in the pool, would be acceptable.

A better idea would be to make it into an aquarium. I don’t mean with a shark and periodic kitten feedings but a genuine world class tropical fish tank where they are fed with a t-shirt gun.

Hey, just running stuff up a flagpole, seeing who salutes. One thing for sure, there will not be any cetaceans. Our local aquarium has been banned from having any in captivity. Thx for reading! Hope you are enjoying your summer!